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Igor Boguslavsky
Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Russian
Academy of Science
Nicoletta Calzolari
Istituto di Linguistica Computazionale, Pisa
Frantisek Cermak
Czech National Corpus, Charles University,
Prague
Marilyn Deegan
Oxford University, King´s College London
Christiane Fellbaum
Princeton University, Global WordNet
Association
Monika Henzinger
EPFL Lausanne
Truus Kruyt
Universitaet zu Koeln, Universitaet Muenster
Joseph Mariani
LIMSI
Jerome McGann
University of Virginia
Deb Kumar Roy
MIT Media Laboratory
Harold Short
Centre for Computing in the Humanities,
King´s College London
C.M. Sperberg-McQueen
World Wide Web Consortium - W3C
Paul Turnbull
Griffith University, Australia
John Unsworth
University of Illinois, Urbana-
Champaign
Igor Boguslavsky
Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Russian Academy of Science

Professor at the Department for Artificial Intelligence at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid and Head of the Computational Linguistics Laboratory at the Institute for Information Transmission Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The main line of research of the Laboratory is the functioning of natural language as a means of information transmission. Basic research activities are oriented towards the development of a fully operational formal model of language of the Meaning<=>Text class. This is expected to simulate the linguistic behaviour of humans, primarily the ability to produce and understand natural language texts. Research interests are computational linguistics, such as machine translation, syntax, semantics and lexicon, and theoretical linguistics such as scope theory and syntax-semantics interface.
Nicoletta Calzolari
Istituto di Linguistica Computazionale, Pisa

Director of the Istituto di Linguistica Computazionale (ILC-CNR), Pisa, Italy. She is involved in national and international projects such as the European LE SPARKLE Project, the European MLIS MUSI Project, European Safe Internet Action Plan POESIA Project, the European IST Thematic Network ENABLER (Network of European National Projects) and the Italian National Project on Lexical Acquisition. Research interests are computational linguistics, human language technology, computational lexicography and lexicology, and corpus linguistics.
Frantisek Cermak
Czech National Corpus, Charles University, Prague

Director of Czech National Corpus since its founding in 1994. Member of the Prague Linguistic Circle, the International Linguistic Association, the Advisory Board of the European Society for Phraseology and the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Corpus Linguistics. Research interests are lexicology, lexicography, phraseology, idiomatics, semantics, morphology, language theory, language methodology, corpus and general linguistics.
Marilyn Deegan
Oxford University
King´s College London

Director of Forced Migration Online, a joint project associated with the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC) at Oxford University, and Director of Research Development of the Centre for Computing in the Humanities at King´s College London. Before the RSC and CCH, Manager for Computing in the Arts at the University of Oxford and Professor of Electronic Library Research at De Montfort University.

Research interests are medieval literatures and cultures, in particular in areas related to health and disease, the use of new technologies in humanities subjects, and digital library development. Since joining the RSC, these interests have broadened to include the historical aspects of forced migration and cultural change.
Christiane Fellbaum
Princeton University, Global WordNet Association

Senior Research Psychologist at Princeton University, President of the Global WordNet Association, former Director of the Project Collocations in the German Language of the 20th Century at the Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften (BBAW). In 2001, she was awarded the Wolfgang Paul Prize of the Alexander-von-Humboldt Foundation.
Research interests are lexical semantics, the syntax-semantics interface, syntactic alternations, computational linguistics, large-scale lexical resources and idioms. Currently researching collocations, focussing on the historic dimension, syntactics, and the lexical-semantic level.
Monika Henzinger
EPFL Lausanne

Works as a Professor at EPFLs Laboratory of Theory and Applications of Algorithms. Former Director of Research at Google Inc. Received an NSF Career Award, a Top 25 Women on the Web Award, and a European Young Investigator Award and is an editor of the IEEE Internet Computing journal.
She has served on the program committee of STOC (Symposium on Theory of Computing), FOCS (Foundations of Computer Science), SODA (Symposium on Discrete Algorithms) and many more, and has also been a reviewer for SIGIR (ACM´s Special Interest Group on Information Retrieval) and the World Wide Web Conference.
Before joining Google, she spent three and a half years on the research staff of the Digital Systems Research Center in Palo Alto, California. She has also held faculty positions in Computer Science Departments at Cornell University and the University of Saarbrücken, Germany.
Research interests include algorithms and data structures as well as web information retrieval.
Truus Kruyt
Haus der Niederlande/ Uni Muenster

Before joining the University of Koeln (2008/2009 and 2009/2010) and the University of Muenster (2007/2008) as a guest professor, Truus Kruyt was working at the Institute for Dutch Lexicology INL, where she was head of the Language Database Department of the INL. Amongst others she was involved in "The Integrated Language Database of 8th - 21st-century Dutch" (ILD) a long-term INL project, aiming to build a multifunctional research instrument in which corpus data, dictionary data and lexicon data are linked in such a way that the research community is able to investigate various aspects of the Dutch language (and culture) throughout the centuries.
Before Dr. Kryut started her career at the INL, she was a researcher in the field of speech technology, which resulted in a PhD in 1985. She is a member of the user group of the Spoken Dutch Corpus (an on-going project).
Joseph Mariani
LIMSI, France

Joseph Mariani has been president of the LIMSI (Computer Sciences Laboratory for Mechanics and Engineering Sciences) from 1989 to 2001. From 2001 to 2006 he has been director of the departement „Technologies de l'Information et de la Communication“ of the „Ministère de la Recherche (Direction de la Technologie)“. In October 2006 he returned to LIMSI and is engaged in several national and international programms in the field of speech technology.
Jerome McGann
University of Virginia

John Stewart Bryan Professor at the University of Virginia. In 2002 he received the Richard W. Lyman Award for Distinguished Contributions to Humanities Computing, and the Modern Language Association´s James Russell Lowell Award. He holds a Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of Chicago.
Amongst others, he is Co-Founder and Co-Director of Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship (NINES), Applied Research in Patacriticism (ARP), and Speculative Computing Laboratory (SPECLAB). He also is a member of the Board of Directors of The Byron Society, a member of the Keats-Shelley Association, the Modern Language Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Research interest is the material conditions of textuality as well as in textual-critical experiments in the uses of markup and data-processing environments for the embodiment, transmission, and ongoing dialogic interpretation of imaginative texts.
Deb Kumar Roy
MIT Media Laboratory

Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at MIT. Director of the Cognitive Machines Group at the MIT Media Laboratory which he founded in 2000; also directs the 10x research program, a lab-wide effort to design new technologies for enhancing human cognitive and physical capabilities. In 2003 appointed as AT&T Career Development Professor.
Research interests include knowledge representation, speech and language processing, machine perception, robotics, information retrieval, cognitive modelling, and human-machine interaction, and has served as guest editor of the journal Artificial Intelligence.
Harold Short
Centre for Computing in the Humanities

Involved in a number of major projects based at King's, including the Prosopography of the Byzantine Empire (PBE), the Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England (PASE), the Clergy of the Church of England Database project (CCED); also involved in two projects based at the Courtauld Institute of Art: the Corpus of Romanesque Scultpure in Britain and Ireland and the Corpus Vitrearum Medii Aevi.
Co-Director of the Office for Humanities Communication (OHC), and a member of the Organising Committee of the Digital Resources for the Humanities Conferences. Co-author, with Lou Burnard of Oxford University, of the feasibility study which led to the setting up of the Arts and Humanities Data Service (AHDS). Member of the steering committee of the ACO*Hum Project, a Europe-wide project for the development of humanities computing components in undergraduate and taught Masters programmes.
Michael Sperberg-McQueen
World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

Co-chair of the W3C's XML Schema Working Group and of the XML Coordination Group. Co-coordinator of the Model Editions Partnership, a project which is creating prototypes of documentary historical editions in electronic form.
Founding editor of the journal Markup Languages: Theory & Practice, and co-chair of the Extreme Markup Languages conference which brings together academics and industrial developers to discuss the theory and practice of markup-based systems.
Prior to joining W3C, worked in the Computer Centers of Princeton University and the University of Illinois at Chicago and served as editor of the Text Encoding Initiative together with Lou Burnard. With Tim Bray and Jean Paoli, he co-edited the W3C recommendation defining XML 1.0.
Research interests are the application of computers to humanistic research, and the electronic representation of textual and other complex material.
Paul Turnbull
Griffith University, Southport, Australia

Professor at the School of Arts/ Griffith University, Southport, Australia. Interested in the theory and practice of history in networked digital media, leading researcher in the new field of historical informatics.
Immediate Past President and Council Member of H-Net, Humanities and Social Sciences On-Line, Executive of the Australasian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Editor of the Electronic Journal of Australian and New Zealand History, Editorial Board Member of Cromohs, an electronic journal of European intellectual history and historiography (University of Pisa), and founder and editor of H-ANZAU, H-Net Network for Australian and New Zealand History.
Research interests are the eighteenth-century, notably voyaging and ethnographic encounter in Oceania as well as in the history of the procurement and scientific uses of the ancestral remains of indigenous Australians.
John Unsworth
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Dean of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS) at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, with appointments as Professor in GSLIS, in the department of English, and on the Library faculty. Served as the first Director of the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, and as a faculty member in the English Department, at the University of Virginia. Organized, incorporated, and chaired the Text Encoding Initiative Consortium, co-chaired the Modern Language Association's Committee on Scholarly Editions, and served as President of the Association for Computers and the Humanities. In 2005 John received the Richard W. Lyman Award from the National Humanities Center.
Research interests are in scholarly communication, policy and strategic issues in electronic scholarly publishing, in the history of publishing, and in humanities computing.